101WINEMAKING.COM      
42.4883667, -77.113860700000038

 

  
 

MAY YOUR WINES FALL BRIGHT!    
    Inventory PRICES reduced.  All inventory is on Dutch St.  
Call to order supplies or email me your wish list, if you want. 
Call 607-368-3449 if you want to meet me here. 
 

How much to add? nice additive addition reduction tool
http://www.winebusiness.com/tools/?go=winemaking.calc&sid=5 

Acid TA and g/L issue for use of the tool at winebusiness.com: 

0.78 TA is same as 7.8 g/L for winebusiness/tool site

Adjusting the TA UP↑

Tartaric acid is used to increase the acid in winemaking if needed. If the initial TA (total acid) of the juice is below .60, a winemaker would want to use tartaric acid to increase the acid.

If the pH is high, such as a 3.5 in a juice, the winemaker would want to increase the acid using tartaric. Tartaric acid will drop out during cold stabilizing if over used.

Do not used citric acid to increase the acid in a low acid wine. It is a strong acid and will not drop out during stabilization, if you overdose. The only way to reduce citric acid is with dilution.

Do not use citric acid if you are planning a malolactic fermentation.

 It is used to neutralize cleaning with barrel kleen or soda ash. We use Citric acid in combination with potassium or sodium metabisulfite for a strong cleaning solution.  We use Citric acid in combination with potassium or sodium metabisulfite for a strong cleaning solution.  For 3 gallons of solution dissolve 0.25 pounds of citric acid in warm water and add 1 ounce of meta.

The recommendation of less ACID BLEND is based on the use of citric acid in these blends.

Malic acid use in wine would have to be a recommendation and not from me. It is reduced during a malolactic fermentation. It is a component of acid blend.

Ascorbic acid is a great anti-oxidant in canning peaches. It is used in hydrogen sulfide procedures. One of our winemakers bought some for his coffee pot!

We also carry tannin (dark in color) but not tannic acid. The addition of tannin increases the astringency of wines, which we are accustomed to in reds. Use per recipe.  If you overdose the tannin, fine with gelatin.  It will remove the tannin. 

Departments

May Your Wines Fall Bright!