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MAY YOUR WINES FALL BRIGHT!    
    Inventory PRICES reduced.  All inventory is on Dutch St.  
Call to order supplies or email me your wish list, if you want. 
Call 607-368-3449 if you want to meet me here. 
 

 De-GASSER Fermtech

De-GASSER Fermtech

The Wine Whip
 

plastic

degasser stirrer

  Slightly angled plastic whip that attaches to a standard 3/8 variable speed drill.
  The Wine Whip....
 This may take 5-6 minutes of whipping.

Degassing Your Wine properly is an important step in wine making. Providing oxygen (needed to get started) and sugar (needed to keep going) are present in your juice, your yeast will go to work transforming the natural sugars in your grape must into alcohol. During this process one of the by-products is carbon dioxide (CO2) also commonly know as “gas”. Most of this C02 escapes through the airlock, but some of it remains in the wine in solution. If you do not properly “degas” your wine before bottling you may end up with a mildly carbonated wine, which bites your tongue.

Before degassing your wine you must first wait until the fermentation is completely finished and the wine is dry. Do this by taking a hydrometer or specific gravity reading. Your wine should finish at a reading of negative 1.2 or 2 on the balling scale or between .996 and .990 on a SG scale.

Rack to a clean fermenter or carboy.  Attach your plastic de-gasser "The Whip" to your 3/8 variable speed drill.  The Whip will fit into a carboy.  Make sure the bung that comes with the degasser is well seated into the neck of the carboy.  These are Buon Vino Bungs and can be interchanged with the larger bung that fits the PET carboys.   Allow some head space in your container as the wine will foam and bubble.  Use a SLOW speed.  Degassing may take 5-6 minutes. 

Important: when degassing is completed, transfer the wine from your fermenter or carboy to a clean carboy, and/or immediately top up your carboy. Dose the wine with meta and/or sorbate (if sorbate is desired), if you did not do so prior to de-gassing. If the meta and sorbate combination cause a foaming reaction, there is still sugar available and the yeast is still viable. Woops, happens to all of us. You may need to de-gas a second time.

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